A Middle East Transformed: US Foreign Policy & a Crisis of Authority

Location

Social Sciences 311
1100 E University Blvd Room 311
Tucson , AZ

Date: 

Tue, 04/26/2016 - 12:00pm

 

 

THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA SCHOOL OF GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC POLICY PRESENTS:

Ambassador Alberto Fernandez

 

Abstract: While much of the attention of the media and politicians is focused on the brutal phenomenon of ISIS, the Middle East as a whole is undergoing profound transformations. Does the region have hope or is it doomed to seemingly reinforcing cycles of fanaticism and repression? Apart from the overheated rhetoric, what can be discerned from the upheavals in the region and what are the lessons learned for US foreign policy and a possible way forward for a new American Administration?

Ambassador Alberto M. Fernandez is Vice-President of the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI), and a member of the board at the Center for Cyber and Homeland Security (CCHS) at George Washington University. He was a Foreign Service Officer from 1983 to 2015 and served as the State Department’s Coordinator for the Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications from 2012 to 2015. He also served as U.S. Ambassador to Equatorial Guinea and U.S. Charge d’Affaires to Sudan. He held senior public diplomacy positions at the U.S. Embassies in Afghanistan, Jordan, Syria, Guatemala, Kuwait, and in the Department’s Near EastAffairs (NEA) Bureau. Ambassador Fernandez was a career member of the Senior Foreign Service with the rank of Minister-Counselor, he was a recipient of a 2008 Presidential Meritorious Service Award, the 2006 Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Public Diplomacy, a 2003 Superior Honor Award for his work in Afghanistan, among other awards. A graduate of the University of Arizona (B.A. and M.A.) and the Defense Language Institute, he served in the U.S. Army and came to the United States as a refugee from Cuba in 1959. He has published in Soundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal, the AFPC World Almanac ofIslamism, Journal of International Security Affairs, WINEP Policy Brief, the Foreign Service Journal, MEMRI, Brookings, Georgetown Cornerstone, ReVista: the Harvard Review of Latin America, Middle East Quarterly, the Journal of the Assyrian Academic Society (JAAS), and lectured and debated on U.S. foreign policy in numerous international and academic venues.

 

CO-SPONSORED BY CMES AND THE SCHOOL FOR MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICAN STUDIES